You Get What You Always Got

 

When having to deal with corporate branding, I’m constantly frustrated by the incredible amount of money spent on graphic identity that seems to plagiarise, er… borrow, from other organizations’ details. So-called big agencies tout their incredible attention to the so-called buzzwords of the day, surveys, trends, etc… blah, blah, blah. You can tout all that stuff, but, ultimately, the end product has to blow us away. Unfortunately, the majority of what I see these days is the same old thing. I can’t sigh too many times.

We are in the days of Brutalism in graphic design. Brutalist architecture is a style of architecture which flourished from the 1950s to the mid 1970s, spawned from the modernist architectural movement. Brutalist buildings usually are formed with striking repetitive angular geometries. A building may achieve its Brutalist quality through a rough, blocky appearance, and the expression of its structural materials, forms, and (in some cases) services on its exterior. Graphic design is still going through its Brutalism phase and I’m, frankly, very tired of it. This whole concept of brutal simplicity has gone on way too long. And, corporate entities are, unfortunately, all looking the same.

My last post was about Discovery and the journey we must take to change design. These days of design are begging us to push out of this brutalist movement. Let’s push the boundaries like David Carson did in the ’90s.

Designers… Please remember, “If you do what you always did, you will get what you always got.” Cue the sad trombone sound.

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